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03
Jun
2019

Plant ID: Wetlands & Their Borders

06-03-2019 8:30 am -5:30 am

This course introduces students to plants common in and around northeast wetlands.  Nontidal wetland species and upland border species are emphasized.  The instructor will guide students through easy-to-use keys in his “Field Guide to Nontidal Wetland Identification.”  Students will get hands-on experience working in small groups to identify these plants.  The instructor, based on his vast knowledge, will give helpful hints for plant identification.  A variety of wetlands will be visited to expose students to species characterizing typical wetland types in the region.  This course is a good refresher for those individuals who need to brush up or for those who want to sharpen their plant identification skills.

Instructor: Ralph Tiner

Fee:  $175 includes all course materials

 

04
Jun
2019

Basic Wetland Delineator Training

06-04-2019 8:30 am - 06-07-2019 5:30 am
$975.00

This four-day course is designed to provide students with hands-on experience in the field applying the methods and getting critiqued by the instructor and their peers.

Instructor: Ralph Tiner

Fee:  $975.00 includes all course materials

 

09
Jun
2019

Mosses: Structure, Ecology, and Identification

Mosses: Structure, Ecology, and Identification

June 9 - 15, 2019

A beginning course in mosses, emphasizing ecology, structure, and graphic identification. We will focus on the species in the major habitats near Eagle Hill—boreal forests, rocky barrens and shores, wooded swamps, and open bogs—and spend roughly equal amounts of time in the lab and in the field. In both the field and the laboratory our approach is problem based. In the field, we want students to be able understand how habitats work, what the field characters of the common moss groups are, and how to make diagrams showing the ecological relations of the common species. In the lab, we want them to be able to examine a moss systematically, describe its features, and place it in a structural group based on these features. Our approach to identification uses structure and ecology. Almost all of our mosses can be identified by combining information about ecology and substrate with a set of diagnostic features. With some species this can be done in the field, and we will stress field identification whenever possible. With other species it requires a microscope. We have found that both field and microscope work are much easier if you have good tools. We have prepared such tools—ecological and structural charts, a digital atlas, and an identification guide—for the moss volume of the Northern Forest Atlas, and will provide them to students to use. The class will start at the beginning, and is designed to introduce the mosses systematically. It is suitable for, and actually intended for, people who have never studied mosses. It also might be good for someone who has worked on them but is confused by them, or wants to fill some gaps.

Susan Williams (Rowemosser@gmail.com), of Rowe, Massachusetts, has studied the northeastern mosses for twenty-five years, taught about them for twenty, and is currently working on a field guide using the ecological approach we emphasize in this course.

Jerry Jenkins (jcjenkins@hughes.net), of White Creek, New York, has studied plants for fifty years and mosses for forty, and taught about them almost that long. He is currently a researcher with the Adirondack Program of the Wildlife Conservation Society, and directs the Northern Forest Atlas Project, which is developing graphic tools for botany and ecology.  His social media channels are facebook.com/jerryjenkinswcs, twitter.com/jerryjenkinswcs, and instagram.com/jerryjenkinswcs.

Sue and Jerry work work together creating bryophyte image libraries and identification tools for the Northern Forest Atlas. You may see their image libraries at http://northernforestatlas.org/images/. The Digital Atlas of Northern Forest Bryophytes that we will use in the will be available for free download in November, at http://northernforestatlas.org/2016/01/26/moss-digital-atlas/, and the charts of bryophyte genera at http://northernforestatlas.org/2016/07/29/moss-genera-of-the-northern-forest-acrocarps-2/.

Click Here for Link to Descriptive Flyer

09
Jun
2019

Chironomids: Classification, Morphology, Identification, and Lifecycles

Chironomids: Classification, Morphology, Identification, and Lifecycles

June 9 - 15, 2019

Chironomidae midges are a diverse and abundant family of freshwater insects with worldwide distribution and occurrence in variety of habitats. These attributes have proved them to be a good utility tool for environmental biomonitoring and ecological investigation of freshwaters. In most part the taxonomic and biogeographical investigation of this family emerged as a discipline to improve upon this utility. However, difficulty in identification of these taxa and lack of proper association between life stages has prevented their proper use in freshwater investigations. In this seminar I will address some of the issues involved with identification of chironomid. We will learn the morphology of different life stages and their use in taxonomy. We will explore both macroscopic and microscopic morphological characters to sort and identify Chironomidae to different level and using different life stages. Additionally, we will learn methods such as rearing, collecting, preserving and mounting of immatures and adults. 

Armin Namayandeh (a.namayan@taxanama.com) Armin is an aquatic entomologist, focusing mainly on taxonomy and ecology of family Chironomidae (Diptera: Insecta). Armin has worked on various graduate and post graduate freshwater ecology research for over 15 years. His focus for these has been to develop ways to integrate the knowledge of taxonomy and phylogeny into the ecological investigations. Armin’s main research interest lies on Chironomidae of Northern Canada, especially the subpolar and polar regions. He has conducted taxonomic research on Chironomidae of Eastern Arctic, Chironomidae of Athabasca River and its tributaries and Chironomidae of Precambrian Shield in Canada. Currently, he is conducting research on taxonomy of Chironomidae in far northern Ontario and Chironomidae from Fosheim Peninsula in Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada.

Click Here for Link to Descriptive Flyer

10
Jun
2019

ACOE Wetland Delineation and Regional Supplement Training by Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.

06-10-2019 7:30 am
ACOE Wetland Delineation and Regional Supplement Training by Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.

This course trains one to determine if a water body is a Waters of the US using the Clean Water Rule and the pre-Clean Water Rule Rapanos protocol and if a site is a wetland using the Regional Supplement.

Richard Chinn Environmental Training, Inc.

804 Cottage Hill Way, Brandon, FL 33511

Phone: 800.427.0307

Email: info@richardchinn.com

URL: https://www.richardchinn.com

10
Jun
2019

Basic Wetland Delineation in Mesquite, TX

06-10-2019 8:00 am - 06-14-2019 5:00 pm
Basic Wetland Delineation in Mesquite, TX

Learn Basic Wetland Delineation in ONE WEEK! This 5-day in-person course focuses on application of the Regional Supplements and the portions of the 1987 Wetland Delineation Manual still valid as used by the Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and numerous state governments. Learn the technical guidelines for wetland delineations, field indicators of hydrophytic vegetation, hydric soils, and wetland hydrology, methods for making jurisdictional determinations and methods to apply in difficult situations. Class time is divided between lecture and fieldwork (24 lecture, 16 field = 40 contact hours).

10
Jun
2019

Wetland Delineation Training | New York | 2019

06-10-2019 8:30 am
Wetland Delineation Training | New York | 2019

Course Name: Wetland Delineation Training | New York | 2019       (4 days)

Date: June 10-13, 2019

Location: Teatown Lake Reservation, Westchester County, NY

Contact: 1-877-479-2673

Website:  https://swampschool.org/product/wetland-delineation-training-new-york-2019/

11
Jun
2019

Basic NEPA: The Law, Logic, and Language of the National Environmental Policy Act

06-11-2019
Basic NEPA: The Law, Logic, and Language of the National Environmental Policy Act

Attendees will learn the basic and fundamental principles of NEPA practice in this 2-day course all the way from what NEPA is and where it came from, through how it works and when it applies, all the way through scoping NEPA documents and techniques to review the adequacy of NEPA documents.  

Website: https://nwetc.org/course-catalog/pol-302-june-11-12-2019

Contact: info@nwetc.org

11
Jun
2019

Visualizing and Analyzing Environmental Data with R

06-11-2019
Visualizing and Analyzing Environmental Data with R

This course is designed for participants who wish to gain beginning to intermediate skills in using R for manipulating, visualizing and analyzing their environmental data.  This class is taught using real-world environmental data sets and is hands-on, using instructor-led examples. It is applicable to anyone that conducts environmental monitoring or uses environmental data for research, management, or policy-making. 

Website: https://nwetc.org/course-catalog/rstat-400-june-11-12-2019

Contact: info@nwetc.org

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