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Asteraceae: Fall Botanizing and Botanical Surveys

Asteraceae: Fall Botanizing and Botanical Surveys

September 6 – 8, 2019

The aster family has the reputation for being difficult to identify. Within the last several years, even familiar species have had taxonomic revisions, and the genus Aster has all but disappeared, rendering many observers dazed and confused. We will try to puzzle through some of the problematic aspects encountered during the study of this group of plants. This weekend workshop will begin with background on the asters and goldenrods found in eastern Maine and the specialized terminology used in their study. We’ll also consider other members of the Asteraceae that we might expect to find in flower or fruit. Participants will become acquainted the use of keys to identify specimens, then test their skills by identifying specialized structures and keying pressed specimens. We’ll also plan to find asters and goldenrods in the field and study them.

Jill Weber (jillw.@eaglehill.us) is a consulting botanist/ecologist. She received her B.A. in Botany from the University of Northern Colorado and her M.S. in Botany from the University of Maine. Jill has assisted the Nature Conservancy, the Maine Department of Conservation, Maine Coast Heritage Trust, and Acadia National Park with diverse botanical and ecological projects. She is coauthor of The Plants of Acadia National Park, a guide to the vascular flora of the region, and Sedges of Maine: A Field Guide to the Cyperaceae. She recently assisted with the development of the New England Wild Flower Society’s Go Botany plant identification website and the Smithsonian Institution’s Go Orchid website. She works at the Eagle Hill Institute, in Steuben, Maine as a production editor for the Northeastern Naturalist, the Southeastern Naturalist, the Caribbean Naturalist and the Urban Naturalist.

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Event Properties

Event Date 09-06-2019
Location Eagle Hill Institute